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Vulnerable Binge Times

Is there a pattern to your unhealthy eating? Do you find yourself overeating in the evening? Or finding yourself losing control when you eat a certain food?

This is the perfect time to plan ahead and know what you are going to do. Something helpful is having a thought you can practice thinking.

Lets say you always overeat sweets at night and feel guilty. What if when it comes down to the moment you know exactly what you will eat and you feel confident instead of overwhelmed by the amount of food you eat.

For example, tonight I plan on eating dinner and then a snack after. Putting your snack on a plate or in a bowl is helpful to set a clear start and end to the meal. When you are done eating, it is time to do healthy behaviors like self-care and spending time doing things that you enjoy.

Building a habit of structured eating will give you more and more confidence that you can sit through your “vulnerable times” without falling into a full blown binge.

For me, knowing my body can handle food and knowing that I can eat it again when the next opportunity comes around gives me confidence and trust in myself. And every time I face a situation that would have turned into a binge, I don’t have to think twice because I know that I am not going to binge.

Believing in yourself and your ability to handle it before you are faced with an uncomfortable situation makes all the difference.

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Why You Binge

You binge because you believe bingeing is easier than sitting through the urge to binge. 

Sometimes the urge to binge is so habitual that you forget to investigate why you experience it so often.

An urge is always masking a feeling. Maybe you feel anxiety, discomfort, sadness, anger or shame. The second your brain registers that you are feeling something uncomfortable. BAM! Urge.

If you become comfortable with feeling any emotion, the need for bingeing is gone.

Learning to feel confident feeling these emotions has been some of the hardest work of my life. But at least I’m not missing out on half my life.

I invite you to start this work. I’d be happy to schedule a FREE session with you to teach you about your emotions. Just send me an e-mail at: krista@kristacouchcoaching.com

You binge because you believe bingeing is easier than sitting through the urge to binge. 

Sometimes the urge to binge is so habitual that you forget to investigate why you experience it so often.

An urge is always masking a feeling. Maybe you feel anxiety, discomfort, sadness, anger or shame. The second your brain registers that you are feeling something uncomfortable. BAM! Urge.

If you become comfortable with feeling any emotion, the need for bingeing is gone.

Learning to feel confident feeling these emotions has been some of the hardest work of my life. But at least I’m not missing out on half my life.

I invite you to start this work. I’d be happy to schedule a FREE session with you to teach you about your emotions. Just send me an e-mail at: krista@kristacouchcoaching.com

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Compelling Reason

Do you have a compelling reason to recover? The only reason we accomplish anything is if we believe that it is worth it. You have to believe that your reason to recover is more important the intense desire you feel during an urge to binge.

What are your reasons? What makes it worth it to you to sit through intense discomfort?

Really think about it.

And if your reason is strong enough, you will be able to resist an urge.

If you give into an urge, it’s time to think about what reason is more compelling than your current reason.

My compelling reason is that I want to make something of myself. In an eating disorder, I am the least healthy, happy and productive person that I can be. I don’t like that version of myself and I love the version of myself that is healthy, happy and productive.

So what is your compelling reason. Send me an e-mail to let me know at krista@kristacouchcoaching.com

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Why am I a Coach?

I’m a coach because I have used coaching in my own life. My relationship with food became unhealthy at a young age. I restricted, binged and purged. I was essentially a slave to food.

I didn’t want to live my life as a slave, but I didn’t know where to get help. I saw lots of therapist. I just didn’t see results in my life or have tangible tools to use.

Coaching helped me understand myself and other people in a whole new way. My relationship with myself developed and I began to treat myself better than I knew how to before coaching.

I learned how to make peace with food and my body. I embraced my emotions and learned how to sit in discomfort. I was no longer in a hurry to change everything about my life but it changed drastically. All because I learned to manage my thoughts.

E-mail me today if you want to start your own journey to peace with yourself and food. krista@kristacouchcoaching.com

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How to Resist the Urge to Purge

How to Resist the Urge to Purge
Young woman in pain lying on couch at home, casual style indoor shoot

Already overeat? Can’t stop focusing on the food in your stomach?

Healing your relationship with food requires that you learn to feel comfortable with keeping food in your stomach.

So dive in and embrace the discomfort. Your relationship with yourself and your body will grow as you learn to feel comfortable feeling uncomfortable. So get out a notebook and practice this exercise when you feel desire to purge.

1. Put Your Mind Onto Paper

Write down all the thoughts and feelings you have and put them all onto a piece of paper.

2. Notice the Emotions You Feel

Guilt? Embarrassment? Shame? Humiliation? What does it feel like in your body?

3. Treat Yourself Kindly and Remember an Emotion Won’t Kill You

Whether it is physical discomfort or emotional discomfort, it will not last forever. Be curious and let yourself experience the intensity of your emotions without escaping by purging.

You deserve a life free from disordered eating and the lasting physical and emotional consequences. If you want more tools for overcoming bulimia and binge eating, send me an e-mail at krista@kristacouchcoaching.com.

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Embracing the Negative

We can be in a really big rush to get to “Recovery”, the destination where all our problems with food are gone and everything is better.

But when the really uncomfortable emotions come up along the way, we run straight from recovery. The discomfort is just too much.

What if I told you that all the growth and learning happens when we experience discomfort and have to grow? What if I told you feeling sad or anxious can be a good thing.

Don’t be too quick to run away from pain that you forget to grow through it.

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When You Can’t Fall Asleep

When You Can’t Fall Asleep
Woman peacefully sleeping in bed at night

Our sleep patterns have a significant impact on our physical and mental health. But when you are trying to fall asleep with an anxious mind, there are many challenges that can come up.

When you stop using food and other buffering behaviors, you will be bombarded with the emotions that you have been pushing away. This can be scary, but it can also be a great opportunity to get to know yourself.

When you find yourself too anxious and wound up to sleep, try these steps:

1. Write a Thought Download

Grab a peace of paper and write all the thoughts on your mind. Write for 5-15 minutes. It can be messy and scattered, just write anything that comes to mind.

2. Organize Your Thoughts

Separate the helpful thoughts from the unhelpful thoughts and spend time practicing thinking those thoughts.

3. Turn off the Screens

I know it can be tempting to fall asleep with the television on and scrolling through social media, but those things will keep your minding spinning and keep you awake.

4. Practice Some Self Care

Turn on a diffuser, put some lotion on and stretch. Just do whatever feels best for you.

Try some of these things and show yourself the most care by simply taking care of yourself. You deserve a good night’s rest.

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Meal Planning

Having a meal plan is an important thing in recovery. It can allow you to feel satisfied and fueled throughout the day. Plus, knowing what you are eating for your next meal makes it easier to put off eating until your meal when you want to eat for emotional reasons between meals.

Each week I sit with my husband and make a list of what we will have for dinner. It’s casual, but it gives me a good idea of what we need to buy and assures we will use all the food we already have.

I recommend having a place in your kitchen where you write down dinners.

I also have a few breakfast I eat regularly. I always have the ingredients on hand and I sometimes prepare them the night before for convenience.

Early in recovery I would plan all my meals ahead of time, but now I like to be spontaneous. I’ve always stuck with regular meal times though. It keeps me energized and allows me to stick to a schedule.

Planning my meals helps me believe food is always available and makes gorging myself in a binge less appealing.

How can you meal plan this week in order to help your recovery?

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How to Stop Craving Carbs

Do you find yourself craving and over desiring pizza, pasta and even rice?

Every diet I hear about these day talks about limiting carbs and how this is essential to being healthy. This misinformation makes it hard to feel like a healthy person when I eat my rice and pasta.

I am a very athletic person, and I need carbohydrates to fuel my favorite activities. But because I hear so much anti-carb talk, I want to add my perspective.

The thoughts you have about food determine how much you obsess or stress about food. I support the people around me in however they choose to eat, but I like to be very intentional about how and why I eat as well as the thoughts I have about different foods.

I love carbs. They fuel me, they help my brain function well, they help my fluid balance and they satisfy me. When I don’t eat enough of them, my body wants them. So I’m going to keep eating my banana, rice and pasta.

I encourage you to evaluate if the thoughts you have about carbs are helping or hurting you.

Finding balance between health and not overeating due to binges is completely possible, and it all starts with your thoughts.

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Food Rules

You get to set the rules you have about food in your life. Having a healthy relationship with food means that you are setting the rules for your life and not allowing yourself to be confused by all the conflicting nutrition advice that is out there.

What food rules would the healthiest version of you take on?

Some of mine are:
Eating until my body is satisfied
Not eating because of an emotion, but choosing to feel the emotion instead
Not counting calories
Eat foods that nourish and satisfy me

These kind of rules create the relationship with food that serves me and allows me to be the best version of myself.

Set your own rules. And give up the ones that hold you back, confuse you and leave you hungry.

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